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In the News

Artificial intelligence helps scientists map behavior in the fruit fly brain

Science

Can you imagine watching 20,000 videos, 16 minutes apiece, of fruit flies walking, grooming, and chasing mates? Fortunately, you don’t have to, because scientists have designed a computer program that can do it faster. Aided by artificial intelligence, researchers have made 100 billion annotations of behavior from 400,000 flies to create a collection of maps linking fly mannerisms to their corresponding brain regions. Article by Ryan Cross.

Posted July, 2017

Meeting of the minds leads to brain science technology venture

Brown News Office

Article by David Orenstein.

Posted July, 2016

A computer with a great eye is about to transform botany

Wired

Article by Margaret Rhodes

Posted March, 2016

Computer vision can help classify leaves

Brown News Office

So complex are patterns and variations in the vein structures of leaves that botanists struggle to take advantage of them when trying to classify a specimen within the plant kingdom. A new study shows that computer vision technology can provide automated assistance by “learning” how to use venation to assign leaves to their proper family and order. Article by David Orenstein.

Posted March, 2016

Linking two labs a learning opportunity for Ph.D. student

Brown News Office

Aaron Held’s research merges and draws on the expertise of two of the labs in Brown’s broad effort to combat ALS. That role has given him several opportunities to learn novel skills and new science during graduate school. Article by David Orenstein.

Posted January, 2016

In analyzing a scene, we make the easiest judgments first

Brown News Office

Article by David Orenstein.

Posted September, 2015